Introduction to Microsoft Outlook 2010

Introduction to Microsoft Outlook 2010

Gain the core skills you need to work smarter and faster in Microsoft Outlook. This course will help you take control over your meetings, emails, and to-do lists by mastering the essentials of Microsoft Outlook 2010.
6 weeks / 24 Course Hrs
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  • Details
  • Syllabus
  • Requirements
  • Instructor
  • Reviews

Details

Are you overwhelmed by emails, meetings, and to-do lists? Harness the power of Microsoft Outlook 2010, and you'll instantly enhance your efficiency and productivity.

In this course, you'll learn your way around the new ribbon-based interface and get up and running quickly. Then you'll focus on the core skills you really need in order to work smarter and faster. Whether you're new to Outlook or you've been using it for years, you're sure to learn something useful in every lesson. By the end of this course, you'll be a skilled and confident user of this time-saving tool—and you'll never have to worry about missing a meeting, losing an email, or forgetting an important task again!

Enrollment Options:
Instructor-Led
6 weeks Access Course Code: im0
Start Dates*Nov 13 | Dec 11 | Jan 15 | Feb 12
*Choose start date in cart
$109.00

Syllabus

In this lesson, you'll pick up some of the fundamentals of this big, powerful program. You'll jump right in and get your hands dirty by playing with the user interface and learning a couple of different ways to navigate between the major sections that will be covered in this course. And just in case something comes up where you need immediate help, you'll look at how you can activate Outlook's help systems and get answers in seconds.

Today you'll dig into the section of Outlook 2010 where most people spend most of their time: Mail view. Not surprisingly, Mail view is the place where you work with email messages, and after you go over some of the mechanics of the view itself, you'll spend the rest of your time on the basics of email. The lesson will cover sending, receiving, and replying to messages, as well as how you can use the spell-checker and signatures to give your messages some class.

This lesson will address a few more aspects of working in Mail view and with email messages. First you'll look at desktop alerts, flags, and categories. The desktop alerts notify you when new messages arrive, while the flags and categories will help you stay organized and make sure you don't forget to do something important with your messages. You'll also look at how messages are used to transport files around the Internet, and wrap up the lesson with something that most people never figure out about messages.

It's time to move your attention from email over to the related subject of contacts. By the end of this lesson, you'll be able to find your way around Outlook's Contacts views. More importantly, you'll know what contacts can do, and how to use them to keep track of all sorts of information. From there, you'll look at Contact Groups, Outlook 2010's replacement for Distribution Lists. To wrap things up, the lesson will talk a bit about Address Books, an approach to contacting people by email that you'll likely encounter (even if you don't realize it) when using Outlook in a corporate environment.

So far, the course has dealt with communication-related topics like email and contacts. In this lesson, it'll head in another direction. Outlook 2010 has a flexible and easy-to-use Calendar that helps you track and manage all the stuff you need to get done. In this lesson, you'll focus on the basics of using the Calendar, scheduling appointments and meetings, and tracking events. You'll also look at two powerful tools that make working with the Calendar more efficient: the Date Navigator and the Daily Task List. By the time you're done with this lesson, you'll know what you need to know to be able to use your default Outlook Calendar to manage your personal schedule.

This lesson is a continuation of your work with Calendar view. Specifically, it will cover how to create and work with multiple Calendars at once. This leads you to two new features of Outlook 2010, Calendar Groups and Schedule View. You'll learn why these were created, and how they can help you deal with large numbers of Calendars without going crazy from information overload. Last but not least, you'll look at sharing Calendars through email and on the Internet. At the end of this lesson you will not only wrap up your study of Calendar view; you will have reached the halfway point in the course.

This lesson is about getting things done. Outlook tasks and to-dos are ways to keep track of what you need to get done. Tasks are pretty much what you would expect—items that you create to keep track of some particular task. To-dos are somewhat more interesting in that they are Outlook's way of tracking things you need to do something about without creating a special task for them. By the time you're done with this lesson you will clearly understand the difference between tasks and to-dos, and know how to work with the To-Do Bar, Outlook's way of constantly reminding you of the things you need to get done next.

Outlook 2010 is all about communication, but it is also about storing and managing information, too. In this lesson, you'll look at three aspects of Outlook that help with these essential tasks. Notes give you a way to keep track of all those little random bits of information that otherwise would end up on scraps of paper all over the place. Speaking of random stuff, you have shortcuts and the Shortcuts Pane. With these, you can effectively create your own custom Navigation Pane, one that points to the Outlook items most important to you. Even better, you can use shortcuts to point to stuff that's outside of Outlook, meaning you can organize information that's anywhere on your computer, the company network, even out on the Internet. Finally, you'll begin learning about folders. Folders let you organize the masses of information that you can accumulate in Outlook, while the Folder List lets you find them all again. This discussion lays the groundwork for Lesson 9, where folders are revealed to be a key part of automating your work in Outlook.

One of the great things about Outlook is that you can use it for so much of your communications and personal information. But with so many messages, contacts, tasks, notes, and other pieces of information in one place, organizing and managing it for easy and efficient access can be a big chore. In this lesson, you'll learn how Outlook 2010's flexible category system and rules can help you manage the flood of information that flows into your Inbox every day. You'll also learn how to print from Outlook for those rare occasions where you just have to have information on paper.

As you use Outlook 2010 more and more you'll eventually reach the point where you need to store old items for future reference. You'll also get to the point where it's hard to find the information you need because Outlook contains so much. In this lesson, you'll learn about the tools Outlook gives you to automatically archive your old items as well as three different tools for finding those items you know are in there somewhere.

Outlook 2010 does a lot of things, and it often gives you multiple ways to do each of them. In this lesson, you'll look at some cool tips that can make working with Outlook 2010 faster, easier, or just more fun!

Outlook 2010 offers several customization options that you can take advantage of without having to learn programming or develop advanced technical skills. This lesson covers several customizations that you may find useful.

Requirements

  • Adobe Flash Player. Click here to download the Flash Player.
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader. Click here to download the Acrobat Reader.
  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.

Requirements:

Hardware Requirements: 

  • This course must be taken on a PC. It is not suitable for Mac users.

Software Requirements: 

  • PC: Windows XP or later.
  • Mac: OS X Snow Leopard 10.6 or later.
  • Browser: The latest version of Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred. Microsoft Edge is also compatible.
  • Microsoft Outlook 2010 (not included in enrollment).
  • Adobe Flash Player. Click here to download the Flash Player.
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader. Click here to download the Acrobat Reader.
  • Software must be installed and fully operational before the course begins.

Other:

  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.

Prerequisites:

There are no prerequisites to take this course.

Instructional Material Requirements:

The instructional materials required for this course are included in enrollment and will be available online.

Instructor

Bill Mann has written about software for over 15 years. He is the author of numerous books, including "How to Do Everything with Microsoft Office Outlook 2003" and "How to Do Everything with Microsoft Office Outlook 2007." He has led online courses on Outlook 2000, 2002, 2003, 2007, and 2010. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Rochester.

Reviews

I really enjoyed this class and picked up so many tips. I used to feel so inadequate with this and now can understand all the basics!

I am a receptionist, administrative assistant, and tradeshow coordinator. I have thoroughly enjoyed this class as I have used Outlook for years and hadn't even scratched the surface of what it is capable of! I truly believe this will make a huge difference in keeping track of projects, getting back to people, and managing my time more wisely.

I really enjoyed the learning experience. Outlook 2010 really is pretty cool!

I really enjoyed this course. It is my first time taking an online course and I really enjoyed your presentation of the materials. It felt like I was sitting in a classroom. Thanks so much!

Thanks again, Bill, for this class. Now the challenge is to start using the many Outlook features you've shared with us. My boss asked me about the class today so I was glad to give him quite a positive response.

I have been using Outlook for years. Who knew there were still new things to learn even in Lesson 1? I thought it would take several lessons to get to new information. I look forward to this fantastic class.