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ed2go Business Operations A to Z Grant Writing
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A to Z Grant Writing

A to Z Grant Writing will take you through the process of finding and writing a grant application. Using a Theory of Change process to engage stakeholders in framing a grant application, you will prepare a draft of a grant application of your choice step-by-step. In doing so, you will learn what grant funders look for in an application by reviewing pieces of your peers' grant proposals to provide and receive feedback. Additional features include six teachable moments videos and six choose your own adventure branching scenarios.

6 Weeks / 24 Course Hrs
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Learning Method

Instructor-led

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Starting July 14 | August 18
Self-Paced

No instructor. Study on your own schedule

A to Z Grant Writing

Details + Objectives

Course Code: gw1

What You Will Learn
  • The writing profession, outlook, and the work ethic of a grant writer
  • How the grant planning process works
  • Ways to apply peer reviewed strategies when evaluating written assignments
  • The relationship between a theory of change and a grant proposal
How the course is taught
  • Instructor led or self paced online course
  • 6-12 weeks to complete
  • 24 course hours
How you will benefit
  • Complete a grant application from start to finish
  • Organize stakeholders for best use of time and information
  • Develop skills to research grant funding projects
  • Obtain the elements needed for a grant proposal

Outline

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Grant Writer Roles

This first lesson will explore the roles of a grant writer. You will learn about the grant writing profession, what a grant writer does, and, most importantly, the work ethics of a grant writer. As an employee or consultant, realizing just how much a grant writer is expected to do will help you understand the grant profession and the multiple job titles of people who are assigned to write grant requests. By the end of the lesson, you will have had an extensive overview of the field of grant writing and the expected ethics of a grant writer.

Grant Funding Research

What are the best websites for researching grant funding opportunities? So many are rip-off websites, how will you determine what is real and what is fake? In this lesson, you learn how to use different kinds of trusted online grant-research databases to locate funding opportunities for your organization and its projects. By the end of the lesson, you will have developed expert skills in entering on-target keyword search terms for finetuning your grant funding research.

Grant Writing Planning Process

If you know that your nonprofit or NGO needs additional funding, why do you need to understand the grant planning process? In this lesson, you'll learn how to expedite and navigate the grant planning process by using a Theory of Change Grant Project Planning Worksheet. Why can't you just get started by writing your grant proposal? This lesson will also provide rational justification on why the planning process for projects in need of grant funding is a critical step that cannot be bypassed. This pre-writing planning process also enables the grant writer to gather valuable ideas from the project's stakeholders. By the end of the lesson, you'll be eager to explore more information about conducting a Theory of Change Grant Project planning meeting.

Introduction to Peer Review and Constructive Feedback

What is peer review and why is it needed? Why do grant writers need a peer to review their work before hitting the submit button? How important is peer review? In this lesson, you'll learn the importance of providing and receiving feedback from peers. You'll also learn about the fundamentals of the peer- review process in the grant-writing industry. By the end of this lesson, you'll be better able to understand the benefits of peer review by experiencing it firsthand during this course's peer-to-peer review process.

Executive Summary

How can you summarize any topic before you write the finite details about it? How does the executive summary fit into the Theory of Change Grant Project planning process? In this lesson, you'll learn the purpose of an executive summary in the Theory of Change Grant Project planning process. You'll also learn how to outline the information needed for the executive summary. By the end of this lesson, you'll be able to extract information for an executive summary during a Theory of Change Grant Project planning process.

Statement of Need for Funding

Why do you have to prove that you need funding? Can't a potential funder just look at your financial statements and tell that your organization is operating on a shoestring? In this lesson, you'll learn that potential funders require extensive information about your target population, the people or animals, or other types of projects in need of funding. You'll also see that funders require validated information to justify a grant request. By the end of this lesson, you'll be able to quickly drill down the research and statistics needed to present your statement-of-need narrative for potential funding sources.

Benefit to the Target Population

How will grant funding change the dire circumstances for your target population? How will you explain the return on a funder's investment in quantitative terms to show how grant funding will impact your grant project's outcomes? In this lesson, you'll learn how grant-funded projects can initiate change. You will also learn how to delineate the benefits for your target population when the change unfolds within their circumstances. By the end of this lesson, you will be able to articulate return-on-investment outputs for funders.

Project Goals and Measurable Objectives

When you try to write your goals, are you often confused as to how our daily to-do's (aka goals to complete) differ from the goals for a grant project? In this lesson, you will learn about the types of goals for a grant project. You will also learn the correct way to write non-measurable and measurable project goals to include in your final grant application. Using the Theory of Change Grant Project Planning Worksheet, you'll learn how to create project goals for funding requests. By the end of this lesson, you'll be able to create measurable project objectives for each goal.

Evidence-Based Solutions to Address the Need

Did you know that your solutions to solve the target population's needs must be evidence-based? Did you know that potential funders rely on accurate, well-researched best-practice models to form the framework for all of the activities that you plan to carry out when your grant project is funded? In this lesson, you'll learn how to research evidence-based solutions and why potential funders require them. You'll also learn how to use the Internet to identify best-practice models in your project's subject area. By the end of this lesson, you'll be able to create activities and timelines for your grant-funded project's implementation plan.

Resources

How do you think a potential funder views your grant request when you have nothing to leverage against the grant project's budget request? In this lesson, you will learn how to identify the internal resources available for grant projects. You'll also learn how to identify the external resources for your grant project. By the end of this lesson, with the help of your stakeholders, you'll be able to create a comprehensive list of internal and external resources during a Theory of Change Grant Project planning meeting.

Funding Outcomes and Evaluation

Why does every funder's guidelines for submitting a grant request include a section on your funding outcomes and how you will evaluate the grant-funded project? How can you predict outcomes before the funding is awarded? In this lesson, you'll learn how to fully describe the outcomes for your grant project during the Theory of Change Grant Project planning process. You'll also learn how your project's stakeholders can help you outline the changes that will happen for the target population as a direct effect of the project's funding. By the end of this lesson, you'll be able to create an evaluation plan that describes your grant-funded project's projected success.

Developing a Project Budget

Do you get nervous when you have to guess how much funding is needed to support the implementation of a grant project? Is juggling numbers your least favorite task? In this lesson, you'll learn how to outline your project's budget expenses by using every narrative section that you've already written in your Theory of Change Grant Project Planning Worksheet. You'll also learn how to justify each line-item expense for your grant project. By the end of this lesson, you'll be able to quickly identify the difference between soft and hard cash leveraging funds and to develop a comprehensive grant project budget summary and a detailed narrative document.

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Instructors & Support

Beverly Browning

Dr. Beverly A. Browning is a grant writing consultant and visionary who leverages her thought leadership experience to help nonprofit organizations overcome their struggles with revenue stream imbalances. Beverly has researched grant funding, grantmaking trends, and board-related barriers to nonprofit capacity building for over 40 years. She is also the founder and director of the Grant Writing Training Foundation and Bev Browning, LLC, and to date has helped her clients win over $500 million in grant awards and contracts. Beverly is the author of 42 grant-related publications, including six editions of Grant Writing for Dummies. She has taught for ed2go for 20 years.

Requirements

Requirements

Prerequisites:

There are no prerequisites to take this course.

Requirements:

Hardware Requirements:

  • This course can be taken on either a PC, Mac, or Chromebook device.

Software Requirements:

  • PC: Windows 10 or later.
  • Mac: OS X Snow Leopard 10.6 or later.
  • Browser: The latest version of Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred. Microsoft Edge and Safari are also compatible.
  • Microsoft Word or equivalent word processor (not included in enrollment).
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader.
  • Software must be installed and fully operational before the course begins.

Other:

  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.
Instructional Materials

The instructional materials required for this course are included in enrollment and will be available online.

More About

This course speaks mainly to nonprofit organizations, schools, religious institutions, and municipalities seeking grants from foundation, corporate, government, and individual donors. It's also an excellent primer for individuals wishing to become grant writing consultants or community grant writing volunteers.

Many of this course's elements also easily translate to the for-profit field and to individual artists, which are covered in the last sections of the course. Material specifically designed for businesses and individuals is included as well. We'll make sure you learn everything you need to know, no matter what industry you choose.

FAQs

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When can I get started?

Instructor-Led: A new session of each course begins each month. Please refer to the session start dates for scheduling.

Self-Paced: You can start this course at any time your schedule permits.

How does it work?

Instructor-Led: Once a session starts, two lessons will be released each week, for the 6 week duration of your course. You will have access to all previously released lessons until the course ends.

Self-Paced: You have three-month access to the course. After enrolling, you can learn and complete the course at your own pace, within the allotted access period.

How long do I have to complete each lesson?

Instructor-Led: The interactive discussion area for each lesson automatically closes 2 weeks after each lesson is released, so you're encouraged to complete each lesson within two weeks of its release.

Self-Paced: There is no time limit to complete each lesson, other than completing all lessons before your three-month access expires.

What if I need an extension?

Instructor-Led: The Final Exam will be released on the same day as the last lesson. Once the Final Exam has been released, you will have 2 weeks plus 10 days to complete the Final and finish any remaining lessons in your course. No further extensions can be provided beyond these 10 days.

Self-Paced: Because this course is self-paced, no extensions will be granted after the start of your enrollment.

What does it mean to write a grant?

Organizations such as the government, corporations, foundations, or trusts may all have funding they set aside to award to certain nonprofit or for-profit entities for a particular purpose. Grant writing is the process of applying for such funding, and is a vital skill for many businesses and charities. When you take this comprehensive ed2go course, you'll learn these essential skills and more.

What is a grant from the government, versus another funding partner?

Grants from federal or state government agencies are considered public funding, while grants from other sources are typically private funding. Both public and private funding have pros and cons that should be considered when you are choosing where to submit grant proposals. You'll learn all about this in our robust grant writing course.

What skills do I need to be a good grant writer?

Many grant writers start out in another role within the organization before transitioning into a grant writing position. You can also gain experience by volunteering your time in an organization and getting to know the people involved in funding. Additionally, it's a good idea to complete some type of professional grant writer training like this online A to Z Grant Writing course. By following these steps, you'll better understand how to write grants and get funding for the organizations you support.

Do you have to pay back a grant?

No. Grants are money that does not need to be repaid. They consist of funds or products that are gifted by grant makers, often a corporation, trust, foundation, or even government organization, to nonprofits, educational institutions, individuals, and businesses.

Are there different types of grants?

Yes. There are two main types of grants that you will encounter as a professional grant writer: block grants and categorical grants. Block grants are money given for broad purposes and generally have very few stipulations as to how money should be spent. Categorical grants are money given for very specific purposes and often come with several restrictions on how that money can and should be used.

Where do you find grants?

There are many different places you can go to find grants for your organization. Some grants are more general and others are very specific about the types of organizations that qualify and the use of money granted. This A to Z Grant Writing course will walk you through many different ways to find grant money as well as they best ways to fill out applications to ensure that you receive it.

How do I gain experience as a grant writer?

Many grant writers start out in another role within the organization before transitioning into a grant writing position. You can also gain experience by volunteering your time in an organization and getting to know the people involved in funding. Additionally, it's a good idea to complete some type of professional grant writer training like this online A to Z Grant Writing course. By following these steps, you'll better understand how to write grants and get funding for the organizations you support.

Are there other places to gain experience useful in grant writing?

Yes. Experience in communications, budgeting, or fundraising can be valuable to you as you begin writing grants. Volunteer positions with non-profit organizations can also be valuable as you learn the inner workings of these types of organizations.

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