Introduction to Networking

Introduction to Networking

Learn to perform basic computer networking tasks such as DSL connectivity, configuring connections to an ISP and creating a private network. This course explains computer networking basics in easy-to-understand terms, using concepts common to everyday, non-computing experience.
6 weeks / 24 Course Hrs
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  • Details
  • Syllabus
  • Requirements
  • Instructor
  • Reviews

Details

Introduction to Networking explains computer networking basics in easy to understand terms, using concepts common to everyday, non-computing experience. A brief introduction explains how networks have become so important to businesses and individuals. This course emphasizes networking fundamentals, explaining the software and hardware that makes networking possible. 

On completion of the course, you will be capable of performing basic computer networking tasks such as DSL connectivity configuring connections to an Internet Service Provider and creating a private network. Be ready to begin training for CCNA Certification or employment in a computer-networking career.

Enrollment Options:
Instructor-Led
6 weeks Access Course Code: itn
Start Dates*Oct 16 | Nov 13 | Dec 11 | Jan 15
*Choose start date in cart
$115.00
Self-Paced
3 Months Access Course Code: T9219
No Instructor, Start Anytime
$115.00

Syllabus

Have you ever wondered how networks started? In your first lesson, you will learn how networks have evolved over the last hundred years. By the time you've completed this lesson, you will have a framework of knowledge that will take you through the rest of the course.

In this lesson, you will jump right into networks and networking, with examples from everyday experience. You will learn how to tell the difference between a network and networking and realize that computer networks are a lot like freeway networks. You will never look at an interstate the same way again.

Have you ever heard someone refer to a computer as a server? Maybe you've heard someone talk about connecting computers in a peer-to-peer environment. In this lesson, you will learn how to tell the difference between client/server and peer-to-peer networks, and when to use one instead of the other.

Many people have heard of Ethernet, but what does that mean exactly? This lesson is all about Ethernet. Is Ethernet or Token Ring the best modern network technology, and why? In this lesson, you will get those answers and many more.

This lesson explores how routers operate, and you will see why routers operate a lot like how a receptionist in a growing company handles telephone calls. Then, you will find out how a single interconnected network (the Internet) can actually span the entire globe.

Computers communicate over a network using something called a protocol. Protocols are similar to languages, and in this lesson, you will learn about the protocols used in networking. You will also learn which protocol has emerged as the dominant computer protocol, and why.

This lesson explores how the networking protocol TCP/IP operates. You will learn how TCP/IP uses addresses to direct data to its rightful owner—it's similar to how you use street addresses.

Have you ever wondered how your computer converts a World Wide Web address into a website that appears on your screen? In this lesson, you will learn how the Domain Name System (DNS) translates names into numeric addresses, and how all that allows your favorite website, email, or file to appear on your computer screen.

This lesson looks at Wide Area Networks (WANs) and how they compare to Local Area Networks (LANs). You will learn all about how data gets sent over long distances and how the Internet changed expensive, long-distance network connections. You will also learn how VPNs secure those Internet connections from prying eyes.

If you connect to the Internet, you use remote access. This lesson explores the traditional means of connecting to remote LANs and how DSL and cable Internet access works. You will learn the means by which many people connect to the Internet, including wireless and cellular networks.

In this lesson, you will apply many of the concepts you've learned so far in this course. You will come to understand what's going on behind the scenes. From there, you will learn how to connect to the Internet using broadband connections, configuring a home router, and testing what you've done.

Your final lesson ties together all the previous lessons, clarifying how new information about networks and networking can be quickly understood. You will learn three categories into which networking knowledge can be placed.

Requirements

  • Adobe Flash Player. Click here to download the Flash Player.
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader. Click here to download the Acrobat Reader.
  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.

Requirements:

Hardware Requirements: 

  • This course can be taken on either a PC or Mac device.

Software Requirements: 

  • PC: Windows XP or later.
  • Mac: OS X Snow Leopard 10.6 or later.
  • Browser: The latest version of Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred. Microsoft Edge and Safari are also compatible.
  • Adobe Flash Player. Click here to download the Flash Player.
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader. Click here to download the Acrobat Reader.
  • Software must be installed and fully operational before the course begins.

Other:

  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.

Prerequisites:

There are no prerequisites to take this course.

Instructional Material Requirements:

The instructional materials required for this course are included in enrollment and will be available online.

Instructor

David Iseminger David Iseminger

David Iseminger is a computer and networking expert and an experienced teacher of networking topics. He has worked at Microsoft Corporation as a telecommunications specialist, networking performance analyst, and lead programming writer for cutting-edge network disciplines. Iseminger has also published 12 books about computers and networking. He is a graduate of the University of Washington, where he earned degrees in English and Comparative Literature, with a minor in writing.

Reviews

Excellent course content, good analogies and examples. Explained in an easily understood manner. Content was perfect for an introductory course.

Excellent course. Lots of information was provided, however it was a very easy-to-follow format and it was kept interesting.

Excellent use of illustrations as a means of clarifying initially difficult concepts. Very clear writing style. I also enjoyed the humor. Overall, an excellent course.

Finally, someone who completely understands his subject and is capable of conveying that understanding to others. This course met the criteria for effective teaching: Explain clearly, Illustrate and show practical application. I will be back for more!!!

I especially liked the instructor's writing style and analogies. I feel the course taught me what it promised.

I really, really enjoyed this class and I am a recent Information Systems graduate. There needs to be more instructors like David Iseminger. He is very user friendly. I will take his next course.

I think course was very informative organized very well and the concepts built on each other to help with understanding the topics. I really enjoyed the course and plan to take additional courses in the future.

I thought the presentation of the material by the instructer was done in a way that made it easy to understand the various complex issues in this course.

I wanted to learn more about a complex and somewhat abstract subject ie networks and networking. I was pleased that the writing style kept my interest and introduced complex subjects in a matter of fact style. I don't think I would have gotten as much out of just reading a book on the subject. Certainly has proven helpful to me in my day to day dealings with computer networks and the internet thank you.