Medical Billing and Coding (Voucher Included)

Whether you are just starting work or transitioning from a different field, there has never been a better time to enter a career in medical billing and coding. More than one million practicing physicians in the U.S. rely on medical billers and coders to receive payment for their services. Medical billing and coding positions are in-demand within medical facilities, health insurance companies, specialty pharmacies, medical suppliers, consulting firms, and national medical coding and billing...

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12 Months / 370 Course Hrs
Open Enrollment
Offered in partnership with your preferred school

George Mason University

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Course code: GES1014

What you will learn

  • Get a better understanding of the value this course provides from our  medical billing and coding certification video overview
  • Medical coding terminology is required for medical coding, including the structures and functions of the human body
  • The disorders and medical procedures common to each body system
  • Legal, ethical, and regulatory concepts central to the field, including HIPAA compliance and third-party guidelines for filing insurance claims
  • The main coding manuals: ICD-10-CM, ICD-10-PCS, CPT, and HCPCS Level II
  • How to code diagnoses, services, and procedures for all systems of the body
  • Fundamentals of medical billing and coding and medical terminology
  • Word parts and the structures and functions of the human body

How you will benefit

  • Get hands-on, practical experience in medical billing and coding that will help you on the job
  • Receive a Certificate of Completion and an exam voucher for the professional exam of your choice
  • Receive access to study materials and prepare to sit for the medical billing and coding certification exam that best aligns with your interest and career goals:
    • Certified Professional Coder (CPC) exam offered by the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC)
    • Certified Coding Associate (CCA) exam offered by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA)
    • Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS) exam offered by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA)

How the course is taught

  • Self-paced, online course
  • 12 Months to complete
  • Open enrollment, begin anytime
  • 370 course hours
  1. Medical Terminology
    1. Introduction to Medical Terminology
    2. The Musculoskeletal System
    3. The Cardiovascular System
    4. The Lymphatic and Immune Systems
    5. The Respiratory System
    6. The Digestive System
    7. The Urinary System
    8. The Nervous System
    9. The Special Senses The Eyes and Ears
    10. The Integumentary System
    11. The Endocrine System
    12. The Reproductive System
    13. Diagnostic Procedures, Nuclear Medicine, Pharmacology
  2. Medical Billing and Coding
    1. Introduction to Medical Billing and Coding
      1. Career Opportunities
      2. Personal and Technical Qualifications
      3. Employment Settings
      4. Telecommunications
      5. Professional Certifications
    2. Introduction to Health Insurance
      1. Health Insurance Terminology
      2. Commercial and Government Payers
      3. Healthcare Documentation
      4. Electronic Health Record
    3. Managed Healthcare
      1. Types of Reimbursement
      2. Managed Care Providers
      3. Managed Care Models
      4. Consumer-Directed Health Plans
    4. Revenue Cycle Management
      1. Phases of Revenue Cycle Management
      2. Encounter Form, Chargemaster
      3. Insurance Claim Cycle
      4. New Patient Registration
      5. Collection Practices
    5. Legal Aspects of Health Insurance and Reimbursement
      1. Laws Affecting Healthcare
      2. Protected Health Information
      3. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
      4. Fraud and Abuse in Medical Billing and Coding
      5. Release of Information
    6. VI. ICD-10-CM Coding
      1. Overview of ICD-10-CM
      2. Key Features
      3. Organization of the Codebook
      4. Index to Diseases and Injuries
      5. Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries
      6. Coding Conventions
      7. Official Guidelines
    7. CPT Coding
      1. Overview of Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS)
      2. Category I, Category II, and Category III Codes
      3. Organization of the Codebook
      4. Main CPT Sections
      5. Evaluation and Management
      6. Anesthesia
      7. Surgery
      8. Radiology
      9. Pathology and Laboratory
      10. Medicine
      11. Code Modifiers
    8. HCPCS Level II Coding
      1. Overview of HCPCS Level II
      2. Organization of the Codebook
      3. Durable Medical Equipment
    9. ICD-10-PCS Coding
      1. Overview of ICD-10-PCS
      2. Code Structure
      3. Definitions
      4. Index
      5. Code Tables
      6. Coding Steps
    10. Pharmacology for Coders
      1. Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics
      2. Routes of Administration
      3. Drug Classifications
      4. Prescription Drugs and Over-the-Counter Drugs
      5. Controlled Substances
      6. Medication Lists and the Electronic Health Record
      MIDTERM
    11. Clinical Documentation Improvement (CDI)
      1. Deficiencies in Documentation
      2. Medical Necessity
      3. Auditing
      4. Coding From Patient Documentation
    12. Insurance Claims
      1. National Uniform Claim Committee
      2. CMS-1500 Claim Form
      3. Patient and Insured Information
      4. Physician or Supplier Information
      5. UB-04 Claim Form
    13. Commercial Insurance
      1. Individual/Group Health Insurance, Automobile, Disability, Liability, Workers' Compensation
      2. Completing Commercial Health Insurance Claims
    14. Blue Cross Blue Shield
      1. History of BCBS
      2. Types of BCBS Plans
      3. Participating/Nonparticipating Providers
      4. BCBS Billing and Payment Guidelines
    15. Medicare
      1. Medicare Eligibility
      2. Medicare Part A, B, C, and D
      3. National Coverage Determinations/Local Coverage Determinations
      4. Participating/Nonparticipating Providers
      5. Physician Fee Schedule
      6. Medicare Billing and Payment Guidelines/NCCI
    16. Medicaid, CHIP, TRICARE, Workers' Compensation
      1. Medicaid
      2. Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
      3. TRICARE
      4. Workers' Compensation
    17. Certification
      1. Selecting the Right Certification
      2. Study Strategies for the Certification Exam
      3. Prior to the Exam
      4. Morning of the Exam
      5. During the Exam
    18. How to Find a Job in Medical Billing and Coding
      1. Formulating Your Career Goals
      2. What Employers Want
      3. Showcasing Your Skills
      4. Resume Tips
      5. Cover Letter Tips
      6. Interview Questions
  3. FINAL

Nancy Smith

Nancy Smith has over 30 years of experience in the healthcare industry. Her clinical experience includes working as a medical assistant for a network of rural health clinics, and as a medical coder, insurance claims specialist, and medical records auditor. She worked as a medical office manager for ten years, where she recruited and trained all medical assistants. Nancy holds a bachelor's degree in vocational education and has developed and taught medical assistant programs.

LaTisha Cottingham

LaTisha Cottingham has over 20 years of experience in the healthcare industry. She has six years of teaching experience in the field of medical billing and coding and Medical Assisting. Currently, she is employed as an HIM Analyst for a Long-Term Care establishment that is based out of Alabama. Previously she was employed as the lead instructor for the Allied Health Department for a local career institute. LaTisha's field of expertise is in the area of physician-based inpatient coding and Emergency Department coding. The certifications that she holds are as follows: a Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT), a Certified Professional Coder (CPC), and a Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA). In preparation for ICD-10-CM, LaTisha received her ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer Certification from American Health Information Association (AHIMA), where she is currently a member. LaTisha is also a member of the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC) and the National Healthcare Association (NHA) where she is a test proctor.

Carline Dalgleish

Carline Dalgleish has worked in medical office administration for over 30 years. She holds a bachelor's degree in Business Information Systems, a master's degree in Leadership, and a post-baccalaureate certificate in Health Information Management. She is a Registered Health Information Administrator and an AHIMA Approved ICD-10-CM/PCS Trainer. Dalgleish is the author of an ICD-10 coding system and owns her own consulting firm.

Lydia S. Stewart

Lydia S. Stewart, RN, BSN, currently serves as the Revenue Cycle Manager at a large regional medical center. Lydia has been a Registered Nurse for 23 years, 15 of those years specializing in Critical Care Nursing and supervision. She is responsible for Medical Audits, Charge Capture, and governmental compliance audits and reviews. Lydia is a member of the Louisiana Medical Auditor Association and Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA).

Bunny Reeves

Bunny Reeves is the senior ambulatory surgery coder at the Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. She trains student coders at Maimonides Medical Center and previously trained and supervised entry-level coders at Staten Island's St. Vincent Medical Center. Reeves is a Certified Coding Specialist, accredited by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

Sharon L. Blackford

Sharon L. Blackford, MA, BA, RMA, has over 30 years of experience in the medical field. She has a Master's degree in Organizational Management, a Bachelor's degree in Business Management, and has served as a Registered Medical Assistant since 1994. Sharon was an active duty Clinical Specialist in the U.S. Army for 10 years. Sharon later moved to the Gulf Coast to accept a position as the Director of Education of Blue Cliff College and was promoted to Campus Director.

Stacey O'Brien

Stacey O'Brien has more than 10 years of experience in medical coding and reimbursement. Ms. O'Brien has been a risk adjustment coder for a Medicare advantage plan, audited medical records for a consulting firm, and currently supervises the coding and electronic claims submission process for a group medical practice. She has a bachelor's degree from the University of Pittsburgh and a CPC coding certification from the AAPC.

Mary Mould

Mary Mould has a bachelor's in veterinary technology and a master's in education. She has taught veterinary technology courses for 22 years and distance education for over 24 years. Completing her education through distance learning has been extremely helpful in understanding her students and the variables that go along with distance learning.

Instructor Interaction: The instructor looks forward to interacting with learners in the online moderated discussion area to share their expertise and answer any questions you may have on the course content.

Prerequisites:

There are no prerequisites to take this course.

Certification Requirements:

In order to sit for national certification exams, candidates must have a high school diploma or equivalent. Therefore, it is recommended you have this before enrolling in this course. Certification exams offered by AAPC and NHA are only available online to candidates located in the US. AHIMA only offers in-person exams in both the US and Globally.

Requirements:

Hardware Requirements:

  • This course can be taken on either a PC, Mac, or Chromebook.

Software Requirements:

  • PC: Windows 8 or later.
  • Mac: macOS 10.6 or later.
  • Browser: The latest version of Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox is preferred. Microsoft Edge is also compatible.
  • Microsoft Word or equivalent (not included with enrollment)
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader.
  • Software must be installed and fully operational before the course begins.

Other:

  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.

Instructional Material Requirements:

The instructional materials required for this course are included in enrollment. The following digital textbook for the Medical Terminology are accessed via links in the lessons:

  • Medical Terminology for Health Professions (eBook)

The following digital textbooks for Medical Billing and Coding are accessed via links in the lessons:

  • Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement, by Michelle A. Green
  • Accompanying Workbook: Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement

The following textbooks will be shipped to you approximately 7-10 business days after enrollment in Medical Billing and Coding:

  • ICD-10-CM Expert for Physicians
  • CPT Professional
  • HCPCS Level II Professional

Choice of study guide/voucher package upon course completion:

  • CBCS Study Guide
  • Professional Review Guide for the CCA Examination and ICD-10-PCS Expert
  • Official CPC Certification Study Guide

Please note: You will receive a digital book if the physical book is on backorder.

*The course includes the current year of coding books, and you will be responsible for purchasing your updated coding books from year to year.

According to the AAPC 2023 Salary Survey results, non-certified medical records specialists average $53,749 per year, while certified medical records specialists can average $62,689 annually — 15% more than their non-certified colleagues.

Medical billers and coders are responsible for processing patient data, including medical records and related insurance. In this position, you will code a patient's diagnosis and then request payment from the patient's insurance company. You will play an important role in ensuring that healthcare providers are quickly and accurately paid for the treatment they give patients.

Medical billers and coders work in a variety of settings. The most common settings include hospitals, doctors' offices, and insurance agencies. Some medical billing and coding professionals work for companies that develop medical software, and some work for education institutions that work to train other medical billers and coders. Government agencies have also been known to employ medical billers and coders including the National Center for Health Statistics and Medicaid offices. You may also work for a reputable company from your own home as the AAPC reports that remote work is currently up to 63%!

A day in the life of a medical biller and coder is a rewarding one. You are responsible for ensuring that healthcare providers receive appropriate compensation for the care they provide as well as helping patients get the maximum benefit of their insurance. It is a job that requires a high level of attention to detail at all times because codes must be correct to produce appropriate bills for services. Much of your time will be spent in front of a computer organizing statements, reviewing bills, and performing quality control. You also may be required to negotiate with insurance companies via phone on behalf of providers or patients. It's also important to coordinate with other coders to ensure accuracy and adherence to standards. Finally, you'll want to keep up on the latest developments and regulations in the industry through continuing education.

Medical billers are mainly responsible for submitting patient records to government agencies and insurance companies for services that have been provided in the care of the patient. Medical coders gather information on patient records and assign the proper codes for patient diagnosis which are then used by medical billers to submit claim forms.

Yes. There is a high demand for qualified medical billing and coding professionals in the healthcare industry today. Demand will increase as the population in the Unites States ages. Jobs for these professionals are on the rise and expected to grow faster than average through 2026 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Our medical coding courses are self-paced and completed in 12 months or less. You will then have the option to prepare and sit for one of the following national certifications: 1) NHA's Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS), 2) AAPC's Certified Professional Coder (CPC), or 3) AHIMA's Certified Coding Associate (CCA). Once you are certified, you'll have the qualifications you need to find an entry-level job.

The path to a career in medical billing and coding typically starts with certification. There are different medical billing and coding certifications offered through certifying bodies, so it's important to choose which one is right for you. This course allows you to choose one of three national certifications to sit for upon completion.

To become a Certified Medical Coder, you need to take an online training course that teaches you the CPT®, ICD-10-CM, and HCPCS Level II code sets. Most employers are looking for applicants to have a medical coding certification. After successfully completing this course, you will have the knowledge and skillset to become a medical coder and can sit for one of three national certification exams included in your tuition: 1) NHA's Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS), 2) AAPC's Certified Professional Coder (CPC), or 3) AHIMA's Certified Coding Associate (CCA).

Due to the more technical nature of the job and increased training requirements, medical coders do tend to make more than medical billers on an annual basis. Both medical billers and medical coders are in high demand. According to the AAPC 2023 Salary Survey results, non-certified medical records specialists average $53,749 per year, while certified medical records specialists can average $62,689 annually — 15% more than their noncertified colleagues. Keep in mind, years of experience, specialty, geographic location, and multiple certifications can all play a part in this reporting average.

Other than a handful of exceptions, medical billing and medical coding are two separate professions. You do not need a degree for either profession, but successful coders usually obtain certification. This medical billing and coding course will fully prepare you for a career as either a medical biller or a medical coder, including recommended certification. Once you've completed your training, you will decide which area fits your personality and career goals best and move in that direction.

Yes, this course prepares you for three medical billing and coding certifications: 1) Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS) exam, offered by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA), 2) Certified Professional Coder (CPC) exam, offered by American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC), and 3) Certified Coding Associate (CCA) exam, offered by AHIMA. You will receive a voucher for the certification exam of your choosing after successfully completing the course. Online certification exams through NHA and AAPC are offered in the US only.

This course is open enrollment, so you can register and start the course whenever you are ready. Access to your course can take 24-48 business hours.

After you register, you will receive 12 months to complete the course. The time allotted for completion has been calculated based on the number of course hours.

What if I don't have enough time to complete the course within the time frame provided?

If you are unable to complete the course, contact your Student Advisor to help you work out a suitable completion date. Please note that an extension fee will be charged. If you are funded through a third-party organization, approval may also be required.

Our courses are designed to accommodate various learning preferences. Depending on the course structure, you may get different forms of support. Self-paced courses are designed to be user-friendly and independent, minimizing the need for external support. In courses with instructors, our direct platform support feature includes opportunities for questions, discussions, and remediation, with email and phone support available for select courses. Our student advising team is available to guide you on program requirements and administrative requests, but they do not provide assistance with course content. Our goal is to provide you with the necessary support for success, whether it's through self-paced exploration, direct communication, or guidance from our advising team.

Upon successfully passing the final exam, you will be awarded a certificate of completion from the school or organization that you registered through. In addition, you will receive an exam voucher and applicable study materials for your choice of the following national certification exams: 1) NHA's Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS), 2) AAPC's Certified Professional Coder (CPC), or 3) AHIMA's Certified Coding Associate (CCA).

ed2go courses will help you gain the skills you need to obtain an entry-level position in most cases. However, you should always research the job market in your area before enrolling.

ed2go courses are non-credit, so they do not qualify for federal aid, FAFSA, and Pell Grant. In some states, vocational rehab or workforce development boards may provide funding to take our courses. Additionally, you may qualify for financial assistance if you meet certain requirements. To learn more about financial assistance.

If you have questions that are not answered on our website, representatives are available via LIVE chat. You can also call us at 1-877-221-5151 during regular business hours to have your questions promptly answered. If you are visiting us during non-business hours, please send us a question using the "Contact Us."

American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC)
The American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC) is one of the world's most recognized institutions for professional medical coders, with more than 175,000 members. The AAPC offers more than 30 certifications that include medical billing and coding, compliance, and management, among other topics. These certifications are an excellent way to prove you have a working knowledge of specific aspects of healthcare, and the skills you need to practice in the field. All AAPC certifications share a common goal: help everyone from beginners to experienced professionals advance their careers and contribute positively to the industry.
American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA)
The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) is an organization dedicated to the professional development of those in the health information management industry. AHIMA has been on the cutting edge of data analytics and informatics since its founding in 1928. Today it is the leading association in the field, with more than 103,000 members. AHIMA provides the latest resources for health information professionals and helps them advance their skills and knowledge through its globally recognized certifications. A credential from AHIMA is one of the best you can get in the health information industry.
National Healthcareer Association (NHA)
The National Healthcareer Association (NHA) has a single goal: to improve the quality of patient care in all medical settings. NHA believes that increasing the knowledge, skills, and competency of healthcare professionals will result in improved patient care as well as better efficiency in the healthcare industry. NHA provides a variety of certifications that work toward achieving this goal. The organization is a nationally-recognized and highly-respected healthcare certification provider.