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ed2go Health and Fitness Veterinary Become a Veterinary Assistant III: Practical Skills
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Become a Veterinary Assistant III: Practical Skills

Learn the practical skills you'll need to be a valuable veterinary assistant or educated pet owner. This course is the third installment in the "Become a Veterinary Assistant" series.

Throughout the course, you'll benefit from videos that demonstrate many procedures and techniques, as well as state-of-the-art interactive graphics. It's as close as you can get to actually being right there in the veterinarian's office!

6 Weeks / 24 Course Hrs
Starting July 15, 2020

Offered in Partnership with your Preferred School

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Learning Method

Instructor-led

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Starting July 15 | August 12
Self-Paced

No instructor. Study on your own schedule

Become a Veterinary Assistant III: Practical Skills

Details + Objectives

Course Code: psk

What You Will Learn
  • Explore all the many duties that a veterinary assistant typically performs
  • Learn how to safely restrain an animal for blood tests, urine collection, and injections
  • Find out how to obtain blood samples
  • Learn how to catheterize a bladder
  • Review the basics of blood and urine interpretation
  • Gain a thorough understanding of examination room procedures
How the course is taught
  • Instructor-led or self-paced online course
  • 6-12 weeks to complete
  • 24 course hours
How you will benefit
  • Learn the practical skills you'll need to be a valuable veterinary assistant
  • Gain confidence in your ability to perform the daily tasks of a veterinary assistant
  • Open the door to new opportunities as a veterinary assistant

Outline

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Basic Dog Restraints

You'll begin this course by learning about one of the basic duties of veterinary assistants—how to safely and securely hold animals. Proper restraint techniques are the keys to ensuring that you and the person performing a procedure are safe. In addition to learning those techniques, you'll find out how to assess a patient's body language, how to remove a dog from a cage, and how to use different equipment to control a patient.

Basic Restraint Techniques

You focused on dogs in the last lesson. In this lesson, you'll change the focus to cats. Their body language cues differ from a dog's, so how you handle them will change, too. You'll learn the "stretch," the "scruff," and the "kitty burrito" restraint techniques. Then, you'll examine how to restrain rabbits, birds, and other exotics.

Exams, Pilling, and Nails

Now it's time to learn how to put your new restraint skills to work. Nearly every day, a veterinary assistant will be asked to help restrain an animal for any number of reasons: blood collection, injections, and routine examinations to name a few. Other times, you'll have to conduct a physical exam, give medication, or trim nails. This lesson will provide you with videos as well as detailed, step-by-step instructions to help prepare you for these duties.

Blood Collection

A blood test is a vital way for veterinarians to determine what's wrong with a patient. So taking blood samples and having a working knowledge of an animal's circulatory system is key for a veterinary assistant. After a review of the circulatory system, you'll look at the most common sites for taking blood—jugular, cephalic, and saphenous veins. Then, you'll take a look at the equipment you'll be using (needles, syringes, and blood collection tubes).

Blood Tests

Now that you have a blood sample, what can you do with it? In this lesson, you'll learn about the tests you might help to perform and explore how veterinarians diagnose diseases. Though there are thousands of diseases, a few important ones are anemia, diabetes, kidney disease, and liver failure. You'll quickly learn the difference between white blood cells and chemistries and how to do a PCV and blood smear.

Urine Tests

All fluids tell a story. In this lesson, you'll look at urine and how to take samples. You could just put a bowl under a dog, of course, but there other methods that will help ensure that the sample remains uncontaminated. You'll also look at the tests that you might help to perform on urine, and go over what duties you'll be responsible for.

Surgeries

In this lesson, you'll move into the surgical suite. Although the veterinarian will do the surgery itself, she won't be able to do it alone. You may be asked to clip and scrub a patient for surgery. Other responsibilities could include preparing surgical packs, knowing the names of the surgical instruments, and cleaning and sterilizing those instruments properly. You'll also have a front row seat to a life-saving surgery that was performed on a little dog.

Hygiene 101

While it's not the most glamorous of tasks, keeping anal sacs clear and anal glands healthy is a big part of basic health care for companion animals. You'll learn how to identify an impacted sac and two techniques you can use to remedy this condition. You'll also examine how to clean ears, administer medication, and provide a bath—all common responsibilities that you may be assigned as a veterinary assistant.

Gender, Age, and Dosage Calculations

Suppose someone brings you a little kitten and wants to know if it's a boy or a girl. Can you do it? In this lesson, you'll look at how to identify the gender of kittens, puppies, and bunnies, as well as how to tell their age. Knowing the age of a patient is important when figuring out how much medication to give, so there's also a segment on how to calculate doses of medication to help you figure out what and how much to give your patient.

Exam Room Skills (TPR)

Now you'll move into the exam room. Yes, assistants have to know how to set up the room, but they can also play an important role in preparing the patients before the veterinarian sees them. In this lesson you'll learn about TPR—temperature, pulse, and respiration. You'll also discuss how to take a patient history, what to look for while performing the TPR, and how to identify dehydration.

Radiology and Medical Terminology

Do you know metatarsals from metacarpals? How about ventral from dorsal? In this lesson, you'll get a crash course in medical terminology and how to use it when taking radiographs. You'll also learn how to read x-rays and why bones look white and lungs look dark. You'll discover how to train a dog so you can take a hip x-ray without sedation.

Injections, Vaccines, and Worms

In this last lesson, you'll take a closer look at how to give injections (including vaccines) and how to diagnose one of the most common ailments that afflicts cats and dogs: worms. You'll study collection techniques, proper equipment, what to look for in a sample, and how to identify different types of worms. Finally, the lesson wraps up with some memorable veterinary cases. Maybe they'll inspire you to become a veterinarian yourself!

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Instructors & Support

Jeff Grognet

Jeff Grognet has been a companion animal veterinarian for 25 years. He was a pioneer in the field of veterinary assistant teaching, developing his first course more than 18 years ago. Due to the success of his veterinary receptionist/assistant courses, he expanded his teaching into other high-demand areas including pet first aid and alternative medical therapies for companion animals. He practices at a veterinary hospital and contributes regularly to several magazines.

Requirements

Requirements

Prerequisites:

There are no prerequisites to take this course. However, completion of Become a Veterinary Assistant and Become a Veterinary Assistant II: Canine Reproduction is recommended.

Requirements:

Hardware Requirements:

  • This course can be taken on either a PC or Mac.

Software Requirements:

  • PC: Windows 8 or later.
  • Mac: OS X Snow Leopard 10.6 or later.
  • Browser: The latest version of Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred. Microsoft Edge and Safari are also compatible.
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader. Click here to download the Acrobat Reader.
  • Software must be installed and fully operational before the course begins.

Other:

  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.
Instructional Materials

The instructional materials required for this course are included in enrollment and will be available online.

FAQs

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When can I get started?

Instructor-Led: A new session of each course begins each month. Please refer to the session start dates for scheduling.

Self-Paced: You can start this course at any time your schedule permits.

How does it work?

Instructor-Led: Once a session starts, two lessons will be released each week, for the 6 week duration of your course. You will have access to all previously released lessons until the course ends.

Self-Paced: You have three-month access to the course. After enrolling, you can learn and complete the course at your own pace, within the allotted access period.

How long do I have to complete each lesson?

Instructor-Led: The interactive discussion area for each lesson automatically closes 2 weeks after each lesson is released, so you're encouraged to complete each lesson within two weeks of its release.

Self-Paced: There is no time limit to complete each lesson, other than completing all lessons before your three-month access.

What if I need an extension?

Instructor-Led: The Final Exam will be released on the same day as the last lesson. Once the Final Exam has been released, you will have 2 weeks plus 10 days to complete the Final and finish any remaining lessons in your course. No further extensions can be provided beyond these 10 days.

Self-Paced: Because this course is self-paced, no extensions will be granted after the start of your enrollment.

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